Topical silicone for scars-How to Get Rid of Scars, According to Dermatologists | The Strategist | New York Magazine

Every product is independently selected by obsessive editors. Cybele Fishman , a board-certified dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital. And while scars are sometimes an unavoidable part of healing, there are things you can do to minimize — if not eliminate — the effects. Anita Cela, a dermatologist specializing in cosmetic dermatology. To learn about the best ways to handle those scars, we spoke to four dermatologists: Fishman; Cela; Dr.

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars

The skin therapists are well-trained healthcare professionals who work in their own practice and have a lot of experience with different types of scars and assessment of scars. Please try after some time. Dockery Topical silicone for scars. Send securely. Until today, little is siljcone about the optimal duration of treatment with TSS and the way of application.

Lil wayne i feel like fuckin. Article Tools

I fell, landed on my face, broke my nose and got Sparticus fleshlight intimate apperal concussion. Once my scars diminished I never used the silicone again. The material is capable of allowing moisture and oxygen pass through. This way the scar does not differ dramatically from the surrounding skin. And what time it will be taking to clear the scars, which type of gel i can use for acne scars. Scar Gel Removal. Topical silicon gel is safe and effective treatment for hypertrophic and keloidal scars. She has dark scars all over her body. It consists of natural ingredients Topical silicone for scars rely on proteins and vitamins to strengthen your skin. To get the best effect from this cream, you should use it for at least eight weeks if your scar is new. It depends on whether Topical silicone for scars want to use a silicone cream that dries up to a thin film or thicker and harder to keep attached to the face sheets. While not all of these products are created equally, there is sufficient scientific evidence to suggest that products with the right ingredients namely siliconeif used as directed, can help reduce the size and intensity of scars. Make sure to get the right size and use them appropriately.

Topical self drying silicone gel is a relatively recent treatment modality promoted as an alternative to topical silicone gel sheeting.

  • JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.
  • We used to recommend Mederma since its active ingredient — onion extract — is very efficient in the scar treatment process.

Colleague's E-mail is Invalid. Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Save my selection. The efficacy of Silgel STC-SE on the scar was evaluated by skin hydration, skin moisture evaporation, skin elasticity, basic scar measurements, subjective patient questionnaire data, and image analysis. All subjects had data collected at baseline and weeks 1, 4, 8, 12, and Photographs were taken for image analysis at baseline, week 8, and week Statistical analysis was conducted on all data.

Patient questionnaire data showed great satisfaction with the product. Overall, scar dimensions were significantly reduced. There was a significant decrease from baseline levels in average scar length. Skin elasticity, skin hydration, and skin moisture evaporation did not change significantly from baseline.

Further study is required to draw significant conclusion in regard to the treatment of keloid scars. Global Consolidated Aesthetics is the parent company of Nagor Limited, the manufacturer of the study device. The authors of this article are all paid employees of Global Consolidated Aesthetics or its subsidiaries. Disclosure: The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this article. Sharon A. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

An epidemiologic study by Kantar Health estimated that there were a total of A key identifying feature of hypertrophic and keloid scars is that both types of scars are fibro-proliferative disorders, where there is excess healing and wound repair. A keloid scar is characterized by excess production of scar tissue, which grows as a tumor of scar tissue, exceeding initial scar boundaries.

This type of scar has a genetic predisposition in some individuals with autosomal-dominant features. According to Kwon et al, , topical gel is the first-line treatment for hypertrophic and keloid scars as it is noninvasive and has shown to be clinically effective in many randomized, controlled studies.

Chan et al 5 also found that intervention of wound healing and epithelization is critical in the early phase of healing. Although the mechanism of silicone gel is unknown, there are many hypotheses that have been investigated throughout the literature. One of these mechanisms, proposed by de Giorgi et al , is that it forms a thin film membrane over the skin because of its lack of absorption and cross-linking properties, which acts as a barrier to protect the scar and enable hydration of the scar.

Gallant-Behm and Mustoe, , present a similar hypothesis called occlusion. This hypothesis states that there is increased hydration of the scar resulting in cellular effects.

This study looks to provide an effective means of scar treatment and satisfy the needs of individual patients, providing the best, personal aesthetic outcome of their scars.

A single-center study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Silgel Nagor, United Kingdom , a polysiloxane silicone gel, on hypertrophic and keloid scars. Silgel will be used throughout this article in place if Silgel STC-SE and refers to the study device; when discussing other brands, they will be referred to as the generic, silicone gel.

Investigation was performed over a week period by Alba Science Ltd. Silgel is a clear, nonsticky, silicone gel that is applied to a closed wound. Silgel is a Class I, CE-marked medical device. Patients were divided into 2 groups: Those with recent scars, less than 6 months old, and those with older scars, 6 months to 2 years old. A basic outline of the protocol is illustrated in Figure 1.

All patients were examined by the same physician to assess the suitability of the scar to be treated. Classification hypertrophic or keloid was completed by visual inspection to assess the level of scar growth beyond the original wound site. Patients were prescribed Silgel and instructed to apply a very small amount of the silicone gel to their scar twice daily for 16 weeks. Patients were requested not to use any other cosmetic products on the scarred area or to expose the scarred area to excess ultraviolet light tanning or sunbathing.

Patients were informed to only use the product on clean, intact skin and not to apply the product on the days that they had follow-up visits at the research center. All patients visited the research center Edinburgh, United Kingdom for their baseline visit and subsequent visits at weeks 1, 4, 8, 12, and At baseline, week 8, and week 16 visits, macro photographs were taken by a trained expert.

At each follow-up visit, the same trained nurse collected 3 sets of Corneometer readings, Dermalab TEWL measurements, Dermalab elasticity meter measurements, basic scar measurements length, width, and height , and subjective patient questionnaire data.

Included scar types were those resulting from plastic surgery procedures including breast surgery; general surgical procedures including C-section, trauma wounds, and burns; trivial injuries such as insect bites, ear piercing, or vaccinations.

The patient exclusion criteria were patients with known allergies or sensitivities to silicone and those with active skin conditions or other skin disorders, such as eczema or psoriasis. Patients were also excluded if they were taking regular medication that may influence the response of the skin, such as antiinflammatory medications or antihistamines.

Patients were screened to ensure that they had not participated in a similar study within the last month before recruitment. Female patients were excluded if they were pregnant or at risk of being pregnant. Forty-eight potential patients were screened with 12 subjects failing the initial assessment as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. A description of patient demographics is presented in Table 1.

Seven subjects were withdrawn during the course of the study. Three subjects were withdrawn because of not being able to attend test visits, 3 were withdrawn for missing scheduled visits, and 1 was withdrawn because the patient developed active eczema.

The study physician assessed each scar at baseline and visually identified the scar as hypertrophic or keloid. Scar measurements were taken to determine any change in the size of the scar after treatment. Corneometer readings were used to measure skin hydration. A Dermalab Elasticity meter was used to measure skin elasticity. Skin elasticity measurements consist of 3 values, the necessary force needed to lift the skin a certain distance using negative pressure e , the retraction time or stiffness r , and the viscoelasticity over time, which is calculated from both e and r.

Macro photography using a Nikon D camera and standardized lighting and positioning was performed. Patient opinion for the overall change in appearance of scars was gathered using a Patient Scoring Scale shown in Table 2.

It was used subjectively to grade their scar changes from baseline and to provide opinions of the product and changes observed during treatment. Adverse events, as outlined by the study protocol, were directed immediately to the study sponsor. Any compliance issues with patients were recorded throughout the study period. The study protocol, including informed consent, was reviewed and approved by an independent ethics committee. The study protocol is consistent with the Principles of Good Clinical Practice and was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

Data were recorded onto an electronic case report form throughout the study. Scars were analyzed to assess changes in scar size, color and skin conditions, and patients satisfaction after using Silgel over a relatively short time. Patients were categorized into 3 groups for analysis: group 1 included all subjects in the study, which allows examination of all treated scars up to 2 years old; group 2 included subjects who had scars 6 months or younger, to identify trends specific to early use of the test product; and group 3 included subjects with scars over 6 months and up to 2 years old, to identify trends specific to older scars.

Mean values for each of the measurements were evaluated for all 3 groups. Scar metrics were measured weekly for height, length, and width. Changes in the scar metrics can be seen in Figure 2. There is an observable decrease in average scar width across the 3 groups; this was not validated statistically. Scar height showed a slight decrease in size; however, this also was not validated by statistical significance.

The average length was observed to decrease from around week 4 after treatment with Silgel. This statistical validation indicates a significant decrease in mean scar length, which corresponds to the observational indications. There was no observable difference in skin hydration for the patient groups; slight variations were observed between younger and older scars; however, they were not statistically significant.

Skin moisture evaporation showed very little observable change; it fluctuated between all 3 groups. The initial decrease at week 1 followed by increase at week 8 are likely just fluctuations and are not indicative of a significant overall increase or decrease. There is an observable although small decrease in skin viscoelasticity. No statistically significant different changes in elasticity were detected at any time point.

High-resolution photographs were taken at baseline, week 8, and week 16 and showed great visual improvement as shown in Figure 3. A graph representing the change in redness is shown in Figure 4. Feedback showed improvement over all categories, many of which were significant. Subject opinion of scar improvement showed that there was a gradual improvement in the overall scar appearance over 16 weeks for all groups. Analysis showed that there was a statistically significant difference at each visit from week 4 to 16 for all 3 groups, indicating that there was no deterioration in scar appearance.

A sampling of the survey is shown in Figure 5 and illustrates the marked improvement from week 1 to week Patients also reported that Silgel increased the softness of their skin, was easy to apply, dried easily on the skin, reduced the intensity of color of the scar, and reduced the height of the scar.

Scar treatment is an important field of study in which there is not a significant number of proven effective treatments. This study was initially implemented to assess the treatment of both hypertrophic and keloid scars using Silgel. However, only 2 patients presented with keloid scars, thus making any significant conclusions about the treatment of this type of scar difficult to substantiate.

In addition, keloid scars can take 3 months to develop after wound healing and can continue to grow for up to 1 year. Therefore, for the purposes of this study and the assessment of the effectiveness of Silgel to treat scars, conclusions can be drawn regarding the treatment of hypertrophic scars only.

The overall size of scars showed reduction after treatment with Silgel; the length of the scars showed a statistically significant decrease. The observed time until a statistically significant decrease varied between younger and older scars; younger scars showed reduction in length after 4 weeks, whereas older scars showed a reduction after 8 weeks.

This corresponds with other studies Chan et al that demonstrate the effect of silicone gel on reducing the size of scars. The semiocclusive properties of silicone gel are thought to allow water to evaporate but still act to regenerate the protective barrier function of the epidermis.

Further study is required to support the hypothesis proposed by Tandara and Mustoe 10 , , that silicone gel treatment impedes water loss. There was no statistical change in skin hydration during the study that does not prove the occlusive barrier hypothesis proposed by Beckenstein et al 16 and Gallant-Behm and Mustoe 12 Elasticity fluctuated between increasing and decreasing values, and no statistical significance was found, thus indicating that there was no change in the overall elasticity of the scar site after treatment with Silgel.

Fluctuations are likely due to the inaccessibility of some of the scars for accurate measuring.

Sale 12 Reviews. Scar Fx Silicone scar reduction sheet. What is best to use for a keloid scar from a nose piercing? PuriDerma Cream. Spathodea campanulata Beauv Bignoniaceae A French group reported improved wound healing in the rat burn model with extract from the bark of the African tree, Spathodea campanulata Beauv Bignoniaceae. It allows skin to "breathe".

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars. The Best Scar Removal Creams [Based on clinical trials]

Plast Reconstr Surg ;— Hypertrophic scarring caused by sternotomy is prevalent among Asians. The effectiveness of silicone gel in scar prevention may influence the decision of surgeons and patients regarding its routine use during the postoperative period. The authors conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, prospective clinical trial.

The susceptibility to scar development varied among patients; therefore, sternal wounds were divided into the upper half and the lower half. Two types of coded gel prepared by an independent pharmacist were used on either half. Thus, selection and assessment biases and confounders were eliminated. One hundred wounds in 50 patients were randomized into two arms, 50 control and 50 silicone gels. The median age was 61 years and there were 34 men and 16 women. Ethnic distribution was 28 Malays, 18 Chinese, and four Indians.

No side effect caused by the silicone gel was noted. Ninety-eight percent of patients had moderate to good compliance. The incidence of sternotomy scar was 94 percent. At the third month postoperatively, the silicone gel wounds were scored lower when compared with the control wounds.

The effect of silicone gel in prevention of hypertrophic scar development in sternotomy wounds is promising. This study may popularize the use of silicone gel in all types of surgery to minimize the formation of hypertrophic scars in the early postoperative period.

Editorial note: this prospective, randomized, double-blind study shows that silicone gel significantly softens scars and decreases scar redness, pain and itching. Cytokine production in patients with hypertrophic burn scars. To clarify the significance of the role of the immune system in the formation of proliferative burn scars, this study attempted to identify differential production of cytokines between patients with burn injuries with and without hypertrophic scars.

Mononuclear cell fractions were isolated from the peripheral blood PBMC of each patient and incubated with and without antigenic or mitogenic stimulation. The resultant supernatants were then assayed by ELISA techniques for production of various cytokines. This study suggests that an increase in the production of TGF-beta and of proinflammatory cytokines by mononuclear cells may play a significant role in the processes that lead to excessive scar formation after burn injury. Silicone sheeting decreases fibroblast activity and downregulates TGFbeta2 in hypertrophic scar model.

Int J Surg Invest 2: , Fibroproliferative disorders, which include hypertrophic scars and keloids, represent deviations from the normal process of wound healing. The fibrogenic cytokines have been associated with excessive scarring. An in vitro model to study wound contraction is a fibroblast populated collagen lattice FPCL. This study used FPCL as a method to study the effect of silicone sheeting on hypertrophic scar fibroblasts.

Fibroblast cultures were obtained and collagen lattices were prepared. Silicone sheeting was placed over the collagen matrix versus Saran wrap used as a treatment control. The amount of gel contraction was measured every 24 hours for five days.

The supernatant obtained from the culture medium following completion of the FPCL portion of the experiment was then used in an immunoassay for TGFbeta2. A statistically significant decrease in amount of FPCL contraction occurred between three of the four brands of silicone sheets used compared to untreated control or Saran wrap treated FPCL. The immunoassay for TGFbeta2 showed a statistically significant decrease with all four types of silicone sheeting. FPCLs populated with burn hypertrophic scar fibroblasts exposed to silicone sheeting have decreased contraction compared to an unexposed control and Saran wrap treated control.

In addition, TGFbeta2 is downregulated in the silicone exposed group. It appears that silicone sheeting may act by downregulating fibroblasts and decreasing fibrogenic cytokines. I love InviCible!! I had my annual checkup with my primary care doctor this week. He has not seen my breast After dealing with acne for years I was left with dark spots on my chin.

I heard about InviCible from a Advanced Treatment for Scars and Dark Spots developed by a leading plastic surgeon. Silicone Scar Therapy Topical silicone treatments can improve the appearance and feel of new and old scars. Pubmed Abstract 2. Pubmed Abstract 3. Background Hypertrophic scarring caused by sternotomy is prevalent among Asians. All scars were measured and photographed before treatment onset. Scars were graded 1 to 4 on the basis of criteria in Table 1.

Final photographs were taken at this time. Eleven cases Male:Female ratio was Side effects were few. Allergic reaction to silicone gel was seen in one case and mild desquamation was seen in 2 cases. Since the early s, silicone gel sheeting has been widely used in the treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids.

Several clinical studies and reviews have confirmed its efficacy. While many treatments have been suggested in the past for scars, only a few of them have been supported by prospective studies with adequate control group. Only two treatments can be said to have sufficient evidence for scar management; topical application of silicone gel sheeting and the intralesional injection of corticosteroids. It may also lead to skin irritation, which can require discontinuation of treatment, especially in hot climates.

Gel sheeting is effective for scar control, but patient compliance with the method is not always satisfactory. They usually are contraindicated for large areas and for children.

Self drying silicone gel is appealing because it is effective, no fixation is required; it is invisible when dry; and sun blocks, makeup or both can be applied in combination. However, on areas of the body covered by clothes, it must be perfectly dry before the patient dresses, and this may not be always practical.

All the patients felt the gel was easy to apply, but some complained of prolonged drying time. When the scars are located in visible areas, especially on the face, patients can experience psychological discomfort with the visibility of the treatment. In warm climates, skin reactions are relatively common, often leading to treatment interruption.

Topical silicon gel is safe and effective treatment for hypertrophic and keloidal scars. It is easy to apply and cosmetically acceptable. Source of Support: Nil. Conflict of Interest: None declared. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. J Cutan Aesthet Surg. Neerja Puri and Ashutosh Talwar. Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Address for correspondence: Dr.

Asha Puri, House No. E-mail: moc. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Topical self drying silicone gel is a relatively recent treatment modality promoted as an alternative to topical silicone gel sheeting. Keywords: Keloids, scars, silicone. Silicone gel reduces itching and discomfort associated with scars.

Table 1 Classification of scars according to morphologic features. Grade I Normal Flat, soft, normal color II Mildly hypertrophic Slightly elevated, moderately hard, light to dark pink color III Hypertrophic Elevated within wound margins hard, dark pink to dark red color IV Keloid Very elevated, larger than wound margins, very hard, red to brown color. Open in a separate window. Figure 1. Figure 3. Table 2 Grading of scars after treatment. Figure 2. Topical silicon gel application can overcome some of these limitations.

The molecular basis of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation. Mol Med Today. Dyakov R, Hadjiiski O. Complex treatment and prophylaxis of post-burn cicatrization in childhood.

Ann Burns Fire Disasters. Ahn ST. Topical silicone gel: A new treatment for hypertrophic scars. Topical silicone gel for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scar. Arch Surg. Beranek JT. Why does topical silicone gel improve hypertrophic scars? A hypothesis. Quinn KJ. Silicone gel in the scar treatment. Sawada Y, Sone K. Treatment of scars and keloids with a cream containing silicone oil. Br J Plast Surg.

Topical self drying silicone gel is a relatively recent treatment modality promoted as an alternative to topical silicone gel sheeting. Thirty patients with scars of different types including superficial scars, hypertrophic scars, and keloids were treated with silicon gel application.

Scars vary greatly in quality, depending on individual and racial patient features, the nature of the trauma, and the conditions of wound healing. Other psychological sequelae include posttraumatic stress reactions, loss of self esteem and stigmatization leading to a diminished quality of life. Scar contractures also can determine disabling physical deformities. This study was undertaken to verify the efficacy of a new topical silicone treatment; a self-drying spreadable gel that needs no means of fixation and cannot be seen because of complete transparency.

Silicone gel contains long chain silicone polymer polysiloxanes , silicone dioxide and volatile component. Long chain silicone polymers cross link with silicone dioxide.

It spreads as an ultra thin sheet and works 24 hours per day. It increases hydration of stratum corneum and thereby facilitates regulation of fibroblast production and reduction in collagen production.

It allows skin to "breathe". It protects the scarred tissue from bacterial invasion and prevents bacteria-induced excessive collagen production in the scar tissue. Balance of fibrogenesis and fibrolysis is ultimately restored. It can be applied for any irregular skin or scar surfaces, the face, moving parts joints and flexures and any size of scars.

A tube of 15 gram contains enough silicone gel to treat inches 7. The study enrolled 30 patients having scars. Written informed consent was taken from all the patients before the study. Also, prior approval of hospital ethical committee was taken before the study.

The silicone gel was applied as a thin film twice a day. It was rubbed with fingertips for minutes. For fresh scars, treatment was started just days after wound closure or after days. The scars were evaluated at monthly intervals.

The appearance of scar, including scar type, scar size and scar color was assessed by the physician. We classified hypertrophic scar as a red or dark pink, raised elevated sometimes itchy scar confined within the border of the original surgical incision, with spontaneous regression after several months and a generally poor final appearance.

A keloid is instead classified as a scar red to brown in colour, very elevated, larger than the wound margins very hard and sometimes painful or pruritic with no spontaneous regression. Follow up was done for 6 months. All scars were measured and photographed before treatment onset.

Scars were graded 1 to 4 on the basis of criteria in Table 1. Final photographs were taken at this time. Eleven cases Male:Female ratio was Side effects were few. Allergic reaction to silicone gel was seen in one case and mild desquamation was seen in 2 cases. Since the early s, silicone gel sheeting has been widely used in the treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids.

Several clinical studies and reviews have confirmed its efficacy. While many treatments have been suggested in the past for scars, only a few of them have been supported by prospective studies with adequate control group. Only two treatments can be said to have sufficient evidence for scar management; topical application of silicone gel sheeting and the intralesional injection of corticosteroids. It may also lead to skin irritation, which can require discontinuation of treatment, especially in hot climates.

Gel sheeting is effective for scar control, but patient compliance with the method is not always satisfactory. They usually are contraindicated for large areas and for children. Self drying silicone gel is appealing because it is effective, no fixation is required; it is invisible when dry; and sun blocks, makeup or both can be applied in combination.

However, on areas of the body covered by clothes, it must be perfectly dry before the patient dresses, and this may not be always practical.

All the patients felt the gel was easy to apply, but some complained of prolonged drying time. When the scars are located in visible areas, especially on the face, patients can experience psychological discomfort with the visibility of the treatment.

In warm climates, skin reactions are relatively common, often leading to treatment interruption. Topical silicon gel is safe and effective treatment for hypertrophic and keloidal scars.

It is easy to apply and cosmetically acceptable. Source of Support: Nil. Conflict of Interest: None declared. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. J Cutan Aesthet Surg. Neerja Puri and Ashutosh Talwar. Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Address for correspondence: Dr.

Asha Puri, House No. E-mail: moc. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Topical self drying silicone gel is a relatively recent treatment modality promoted as an alternative to topical silicone gel sheeting. Keywords: Keloids, scars, silicone.

Silicone gel reduces itching and discomfort associated with scars. Table 1 Classification of scars according to morphologic features.

Grade I Normal Flat, soft, normal color II Mildly hypertrophic Slightly elevated, moderately hard, light to dark pink color III Hypertrophic Elevated within wound margins hard, dark pink to dark red color IV Keloid Very elevated, larger than wound margins, very hard, red to brown color. Open in a separate window. Figure 1. Figure 3. Table 2 Grading of scars after treatment. Figure 2. Topical silicon gel application can overcome some of these limitations. The molecular basis of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation.

Mol Med Today. Dyakov R, Hadjiiski O. Complex treatment and prophylaxis of post-burn cicatrization in childhood. Ann Burns Fire Disasters. Ahn ST. Topical silicone gel: A new treatment for hypertrophic scars. Topical silicone gel for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scar. Arch Surg. Beranek JT. Why does topical silicone gel improve hypertrophic scars? A hypothesis. Quinn KJ. Silicone gel in the scar treatment. Sawada Y, Sone K. Treatment of scars and keloids with a cream containing silicone oil.

Br J Plast Surg. Poston J. The use of the silicone gel sheeting in the management of hypertrophic and keloids scars.

J Wound Care. Effects of silicone gel sheet on the stratum corneum hydration. Use of glycerine-based gel sheeting in scar management. Adv Wound Care. Niessen FB. The use of silicone occlusive sheeting Sil-K and silicone occlusive gel Epiderm in the prevention of hypertrophic scar formation. Plast Reconstr Surg. International clinical recommendations on scar management. Plast Reconstruc Surg. Berman B, Flores F. Comparison of a silicone gel filled cushion and silicone gel sheeting for the treatment of hypertrophic or keloid scars.

Topical silicone for scars

Topical silicone for scars