Hard drive contents-Solved: Hard Drive Not Showing Files Though They Still Exist - EaseUS

Technology in terms you understand. Click here. This is a pretty common scenario. There are several approaches to this problem. Become a Patron of Ask Leo!

Hard drive contents

Use the Professional Solution for Recovery: All the preferred and tested manual methods are listed above. Newer hard drives have a Hard drive contents size of several hundred gigabytes to several TB terabytes. Frequently Asked Questions 1. No personal information. Click Proceed. You have several ways to get your data off there and with a little bit of luck you may contentts you a working system again as well. If your data is backed up a single hard drive Hard drive contents is never an issue. For 3.

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By continuing to browse this site, you agree to this use. Restart your Mac. Did this solve your problem? These tools are different from disk cleaning applications, which automatically remove Hard drive contents and cache files. Hard drive contents help with another clue? Here's what you need to know about replacing your Plumper gallery hairy drive and easily moving your data and programs to the new one. Click Restore. It's a dark-blue button in the drve of the page. You'll find this in the middle of the window. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

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  • This wikiHow teaches you how to copy everything that's on your computer's hard drive onto a separate external or internal hard drive.
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Technology in terms you understand. Click here. This is a pretty common scenario. There are several approaches to this problem. Become a Patron of Ask Leo! And, occasionally, there are other reasons — like a last-minute change that was important, but not yet saved online — that might still require retrieving data off the dead drive.

That will scan the disk for surface errors that can cause the disk to become inaccessible. If not, you can get your money back.

SpinRite boots from its own media and can attempt to both diagnose and possibly repair errors on the disk surface. You can determine which you have simply by looking at the drive after removing it from your system. The permissions on the drive are relative to its original system and must be adjusted for the new system. Hard disks die. Cynical folks would say that they tend to die at the worst possible time. The best approach is to prepare for this certainty by backing up.

Nothing can protect you better. Download right-click, Save-As Duration: — 5. Sometimes hard drive failure is due to overheating chips. I learned that freezing your drive and then quickly placing it in a disk enclosure can net the time to you need to retrieve your important files.

I have heard of the freezing the hard drive for a while, but is it freezing the Drive or refrigerator. Also, how long do I do it? The freezing technique actually worked for me once. I could get data off the drive only for a short period of time while very cold. I put my drive in a zip lock bag, then placed it in the freezer for a good hour. Even did it for much longer overnight and it still did the trick. This is the after-all-else-fails attempt, though, and as such, is a long shot.

If you know how to open up a computer you could also just plug it in as a secondary drive, Id think. Copy the files you want Documents and Settings. Go to the target drive and create a new folder.

Open that folder as administrator again. I just finished doing this for a Volunteer Organization that had upgraded from Win-7 to Win I have done this different times when all else fails.

I had a hard drive refuse to boot up….. I purchased a new drive and loaded it as a master and made the old drive a slave. When the new drive booted the system it asked if I wanted to install the system from the slave. Now the system is up and all else is on board. I have a USB to SATA adapter cable and I need to make a windows image of the failing hard drive in my laptop onto my sons laptop so i can then copy it on the the new hard drive I need to install into my laptop.

Or can I simply connect the blank hard drive to my laptop and create the image Either way, what are the steps I need to take to accomplish this? What I would do is get a removable hard drive and back up and restore using that.

You mention that your hard drive is failing. Regular image backups could prevent that from happening. This is a very effective method. Ubuntu or any other similar distro can often read drives that Window will not. Definitely this is worth a shot. I work for a HD manufacture and your best bet is to have your data Backed Up.

If your data is backed up a single hard drive failure is never an issue. Wow that was really helpful can i email you directly when i have another question.

You cleared that all up for me. Any posted emails addresses are removed from this site by the moderators. I would start by booting to Linux. This is just one of many reasons for having a copy of Linux around. As for a hard drive enclosure, there is a similar option — a usb cable. The one cable works with both 2. For 3. You just need to be careful not to touch the live exposed circuit boards.

Lesson learned the hard way. I generally use Puppy Linux for this task. A co-worker has had some success with failed drives in laptops by removing the drive, super-cooling by spraying it with an inverted duster aerosol cleaner inverted so that the contents spray out as a liquid , then remounting the drive and taking a drive image before it fails again. I heard it running so I used Get Data Back and I was able to save my files, granted, it dont work everytime, I have had drives that ran but the software just didnt see it either, its all trial and error, but I have had good luck with doing it this way.

Albert, yes you will have to reload an OS on a new drive unless you have backed your old drive up, you can then run a restore from the saved disk image. I think my problem is above a little bit. The HDD media is corrupted and cannot be repaire. P2 eXplorer can mount dd files too. It works with desktop or laptop drives and turns them into external drives.

RE: Hardware to accomplish task. Kit USB 2. Yes I have a external hard drive which is a cube which had a ussb cable hook to it. When I hook the cable to my computer, the power light will still come on but my computer will not pick up the cube drive, it just want read it as if they are no drive hook to it at all.

What I need to know is can I still get the data off of the cube drive and unto a nother new external turn drive? But is that possible with a RAID array? My problem is that I was getting numerous blue screens and could not keep the computer running long enough to access my data and move it to safety. A very good program — SpinRite — is made for exactly this purpose. I have run it on dead computers many times and brought systems back to life.

Spinrite is also very expensive. Very effective. If you have a drive the computer can not find or can not deal with in any way It is very possible that the controller board on the drive has gone bad and the rest of the drive is good. You can get a new or used controller on Ebay. A screw driver is all that is need to change the board. It is best to get the same revision number of the controller. You can keep using the repaired drive, but I would not recommend it. Just get the data off and use a new drive.

Remember that hard disk are built on price not quality. Plan for them to fail at the end of the warranty. Sometime I think they have a built in timer to know when to fail. The price to fix was about what I paid for the computer. When I bought this the motherboard failed and Dell had me send it back,and it worked about 6 months when the motherboard failed again but this time Dell said to bad we already fixed that problem once already.

The computer will not boot up. I was wondering what possibly could be done, any ideas what I can do? To me this is saying that one or the other has a proprietary connector on it or in it. One time I encountered a HDD with a proprietary non-standard interface connector on it.

Take a closer look at your harddrive. It may be shrouded in a metal shield or jacket — if this looks to be the case, then try taking it off. Be sure that you are not removing assembly screws from the bare drive.

Bare drives usually have circuitry on the bottom side. If your drive looks normal, then it is probably your Sony Vaio that is proprietary. Good luck. One that holds both 3.

Having one on had is beautiful when things go wrong. Yes, I have several of the docks SATA only and they are also great for using internal drives as external. I use these for my backups too.

Then, you can physically swap out the old drive in your computer with the new drive, run the cloning software again on the new drive, and install the cloned image you saved from that external drive or NAS. It's a dark-blue button in the middle of the page. You'll find this in the middle of the window. Click the yellow attached hard drive's icon at the top of the window. A disk image is a massive file that stores all of the information from your computer, but you can't boot from it the same way that you can boot from a cloned hard drive. Click System Preferences….

Hard drive contents

Hard drive contents

Hard drive contents. Footer Resource links

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How To Transfer Files From Old Hard Drive To New Hard Drive?

This wikiHow teaches you how to copy everything that's on your computer's hard drive onto a separate external or internal hard drive. You can easily copy your data to a new system through a file manager or, with Macs, through Migration Assistant. This article was co-authored by Mobile Kangaroo. Mobile Kangaroo has been repairing electronic devices such as computers, phones, and tablets, for over 16 years, with locations in over 20 cities. Categories: Featured Articles Hard Drives. Learn why people trust wikiHow.

Co-authored by Mobile Kangaroo Updated: August 21, Method 1. Make sure that you have the new hard drive. Your new hard drive must be larger than the space that's currently occupied on the hard drive that you want to copy. If you're creating a clone of your hard drive, the new hard drive must be at least the same size. There are two types of hard drive to which you can copy your old hard drive's contents: Internal - A hard drive that sits inside of your computer's housing.

External - A hard drive that connects to your computer via a USB cable. Buy an adapter for your hard drive if necessary. If you're copying your hard drive's contents onto another internal drive, you'll need a USB adapter so that you can attach the new hard drive to your computer. There are two types of hard drive connections: SATA, which has a narrow cable attaching the connector to the drive, and IDE, which has a several-inch-wide cable attaching the connector to the drive. Back up your computer.

Attach your hard drive to your computer. If you're using an internal hard drive with an adapter, make sure that the hard drive is firmly connected to the adapter as well. If you're using an external hard drive on a Mac, you may need to format the drive before you can store your hard drive's contents on it. Method 2. Open the Todo website. It's a dark-blue button in the middle of the page.

Click Download. Do so below the "Free" heading. A pop-up window will appear. You'll do this in the pop-up window. It's at the top of the window. The EaseUS Todo setup file will begin downloading to your computer. Install Todo. Double-click the Todo setup file, then do the following: Click Yes when prompted. Click Finish when prompted.

This will complete the installation and launch Todo. Click Later when prompted. It's in the bottom-right corner of the window. Click the Clone tab. You'll find this at the top of the window.

Check the "Hard disk" box. It's in the upper-left corner of the window. Click Next. This is in the bottom-right corner of the window. Select your new hard drive. Scroll down and check the "Hard disk" box near the bottom of the window.

This should be your attached hard drive. If your new hard drive is a solid state drive SSD , click Advanced options in the bottom-left corner and then click Optimize for SSD in the pop-up menu before proceeding. Click Proceed. Click OK when prompted.

Doing so will prompt Todo to begin copying your hard drive's contents onto the attached hard drive. Wait for your hard drive to finish copying. This can take several hours to complete. Once the process finishes, Todo will notify you. Eject your hard drive from your computer.

Click the flash drive-shaped icon in the bottom-right corner of the screen and click Eject in the pop-up menu, then physically detach the drive from your computer when Windows tells you that it's safe to do so. Method 3. Restart your Mac. Click the Apple menu. Do so immediately after your Mac begins to restart. Wait for the Apple logo to appear. You should keep holding down the keys during this time. You may also see a spinning globe appear here. As soon as you see the spinning globe or Earth icon, release the keys.

You should now be at the recovery screen. Click Disk Utility. It's a grey hard drive icon in the window. Click Continue. This is in the bottom-right corner of the screen. Select your other hard drive. Click the attached hard drive's name in the top-left side of the page. Click Edit. This menu item is at the top of the Mac's screen. A drop-down menu will appear. Click Restore…. It's at the top of the drop-down menu. Click the "Restore from" drop-down box.

You'll find this in the middle of the window. Click Restore. This blue button is in the bottom-right corner of the window. Clicking it prompts your hard drive to begin backing up to the external hard drive.

If you get a "Restoration Failed" error, turn off FileVault and try again. Click Done when prompted. Your original hard drive is now backed up to the new hard drive. Close Disk Utility. Click the red circle in the top-left corner of the window. Click Choose Startup Disk….

It's on the left side of the window. Select your original hard drive and click Restart. Doing so will restart your computer. Open the Apple menu. Click System Preferences…. It's near the top of the Apple drop-down menu. Click Startup Disk. This grey hard drive icon is in the middle of the System Preferences window. Unlock the menu. Click the lock icon in the bottom-left corner of the window, then enter your account password when prompted.

Click the yellow attached hard drive's icon at the top of the window. Click Restart…. It's on the right side of the window. Click Restart when prompted. Doing so will reboot your Mac from the new hard drive, which will ensure that the hard drive is usable as a bootable drive on any other Mac.

Hard drive contents

Hard drive contents

Hard drive contents